It is “glaringly obvious,” says Daron Acemoglu, an economist at MIT, that political leaders are “totally unprepared” to deal with how automation is changing employment. Automation has been displacing workers from a variety of occupations, including ones in manufacturing. And now, he says, AI and the quickening deployment of robots in various industries, including auto manufacturing, metal products, pharmaceuticals, food service, and warehouses, could exacerbate the effects. “We haven’t even begun the debate,” he warns. “We’ve just been papering over the issues.”
Carla O’Dell is the chairman of APQC, a non-profit business research institute focused on benchmarking, best practices, process improvement and knowledge management for a global corporations and consulting firms.  She has authored three books, one on competitiveness and two on knowledge management.  She writes and speaks frequently on the impact of AI and cognitive technologies on how we share knowledge and writes an APQC blog and interviews series called  Big Thinkers, Big Ideas.

Software tests have to be repeated often during development cycles to ensure quality. Every time source code is modified software tests should be repeated. For each release of the software it may be tested on all supported operating systems and hardware configurations. Manually repeating these tests is costly and time consuming. Once created, automated tests can be run over and over again at no additional cost and they are much faster than manual tests. Automated software testing can reduce the time to run repetitive tests from days to hours. A time savings that translates directly into cost savings.
After hearing of a recent Oxford University study on advancing automation and its potential to displace workers, Yuh-Mei Hutt, of Tallahassee, Florida, wrote, “The idea that half of today’s jobs may vanish has changed my view of my children’s future.” Hutt was reacting not only as a mother; she heads a business and occasionally blogs about emerging technologies. Familiar as she is with the upside of computerization, the downside looms large. “How will they compete against AI?” she asked. “How will they compete against a much older and experienced workforce vying for even fewer positions?”
One other smart home platform you might have heard something about is IFTTT. An acronym for "If This, Then That," IFTTT is a free service that lets you craft automation recipes that link smart gadgets, web services, and online tools. Select a cause ("if this") and an effect ("then that"), and the recipe will run automatically. A social networking recipe might automatically save your Instagram photos to a Dropbox folder, for instance. Once you start adding smart home gadgets into the mix things get even more interesting -- and more and more are joining IFTTT's ranks all the time.
When you hear the words “automation,” the first thing that comes to your mind are robots building cars (and stealing your jobs). That’s Industrial Automation, however, and is completely different from BPA. While IA focuses on automating physical human labor (assembling products, for example), BPA means automating processes and workflows (document approval process, employee onboarding process, etc.).
Analysts at Gartner (the world’s leading research and advisory company) evaluated 9 “enterprise-grade” software testing tool. The evaluation involved inquiries with clients, surveys of tool users, vendor responses to questions, and product evaluations. Gartner required tools to support native Windows desktop application testing and Android or iOS testing support as well as support 3 of the following: responsive web applications, mobile applications, packaged applications (SAP, Salesforce, etc.), API/web services. Tools covered include Tricentis, Micro Focus, Microsoft, IBM, SmartBear, CA Technologies, TestPlant, Parasoft, and Ranorex. [Read this software testing tools list]
Parachute into any high-school campus in the country, and chances are you’ll land on an object lesson on technology’s ubiquity in young Americans’ everyday lives. A significant chunk of schoolwork these days necessitates a computer and internet connection, and this work includes tasks students are expected to complete at home without access to school resources. One federal survey conducted among American teachers several years ago found that 70 percent of respondents assign homework that needs to be done online—and 90 percent of high schoolers say they’re assigned internet-based homework at least a few times a month, according to a separate 2017 survey, including 48 percent who get such assignments daily or almost daily.

More CIOs are turning to an emerging technology practice called robotic process automation (RPA) to streamline enterprise operations and reduce costs. With RPA, businesses can automate mundane rules-based business processes, enabling business users to devote more time to serving customers or other higher-value work. Others see RPA as a stopgap en route to intelligent automation (IA) via machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) tools, which can be trained to make judgments about future outputs.


Test automation on the other hand is the automated execution of predefined tests. A test in that context is a sequence of predefined actions interspersed with evaluations, that James Bach calls checks. These checks are manually defined algorithmic decision rules that are evaluated on specific and predefined observation points of a software product. And herein lies the problem. If, for instance, you define an automated test of a website, you might define a check that ascertains a specific text (e.g. the headline) is shown on that website. When executing that test, this is exactly what is checked—and only this. So if your website looks like shown in the picture, your test still passes, making you think everything is ok.
In my organization, we've taken automation to the extreme, and we automate every test we believe will yield a good ROI. Usually, this means we run automation tests on all delivered features at both sanity and end-to-end levels. This way, we achieve 90 percent coverage while also maintaining and growing our test automation suite at all stages of the application lifecycle.
RPA is an application of technology, governed by business logic and structured inputs, aimed at automating business processes. Using RPA tools, a company can configure software, or a “robot,” to capture and interpret applications for processing a transaction, manipulating data, triggering responses and communicating with other digital systems. RPA scenarios range from something as simple as generating an automatic response to an email to deploying thousands of bots, each programmed to automate jobs in an ERP system.
Using a calorie tracker is one of the best ways to get control of your diet. We need to be better informed about what we are eating. Keeping track of what food you’re consuming helps you eat right and make healthier food choices. To lose weight, you have to eat fewer calories than your body burns each day. Tracking calories will help to ensure you create a “calorie deficit”. Likewise, if building muscle, one often needs to eat enough food for a caloric surplus. Tracking calories will help you meet your specific goal. 

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But if the company had one shared test environment where changes needed to be negotiated through change control, that might not actually save any time. We'd have a big, fat bottleneck in front of testing. As Tanya Kravtsov pointed out recently in her presentation at TestBash New York, automating the thing that is not the bottleneck creates the illusion of speed but does not actually improve speed.
Likewise, a Feedback Control System is a system which tends to maintain a prescribed relationship of one system variable to another by comparing functions of these variables and using the difference as a means of control.[6] The advanced type of automation that revolutionized manufacturing, aircraft, communications and other industries, is feedback control, which is usually continuous and involves taking measurements using a sensor and making calculated adjustments to keep the measured variable within a set range.[7][8] The theoretical basis of closed loop automation is control theory.
IBM helps clients around the world transform and manage functional and industry-specific processes to achieve intelligent digital operations. These services rely on AI, process automation and advanced analytics to help deliver higher quality processes at lower cost with less risk. IBM process automation services address the four fundamentals of process design.
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