In my organization, we've taken automation to the extreme, and we automate every test we believe will yield a good ROI. Usually, this means we run automation tests on all delivered features at both sanity and end-to-end levels. This way, we achieve 90 percent coverage while also maintaining and growing our test automation suite at all stages of the application lifecycle.

Created by a former bodybuilder, this comprehensive app delivers a lot of bang for your buck. At the top of the screen, red numerals show you how many of each nutrient (protein, carbs and fat) you have remaining for the rest of your day as you input saved meals or foods from the library. Looking to eat fewer carbs on a recovery day? The app will let you save different macronutrient “goals” that you can choose between, meaning intermittent fasters or athletes whose daily diets often change dramatically will be able to easily switch their goal when desired intake changes. ($2.99; iOS)
With tools like TestComplete, the evolution from manual to automated testing does not have to be difficult. By allowing you to see every action you make, either while generating test code or in administering tests, manual testers can see exactly where to make adjustments while they’re learning. After using automated testing tools and techniques, manual testing has proven to be an effective way of double-checking the software to make sure there is no stone left unturned. In that sense, manual and automated testing go hand-in-hand and, when used properly, can ensure that the final product is as good as it can be.
“The most important thing to consider is the problem you are trying to solve. Many test automation initiatives fail because teams are trying to jump in head first and automate every test possible instead of the most valuable tests according to the goals of development. They find themselves in a maintenance nightmare. Pick the most valuable test you were already performing manually and automate those first.”
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Vendors and user firms are also combining RPA with AI tools like machine learning, natural language processing (NLP) and image recognition. Organizations that take a phased approach to their RPA efforts set themselves up for success as RPA continues to get smarter. One financial services organization accomplished this by categorizing its RPA projects into three categories:

To be sure, many of the things knowledge workers do today will soon be automated. For example, the future role of humans in financial advising isn’t fully clear, but it’s unlikely that those who remain in the field will have as their primary role recommending an optimal portfolio of stocks and bonds. In a recent conversation, one financial adviser seemed worried: “Our advice to clients isn’t fully automated yet,” he said, “but it’s feeling more and more robotic. My comments to clients are increasingly supposed to follow a script, and we are strongly encouraged to move clients into the use of these online tools.” He expressed his biggest fear outright: “I’m thinking that over time they will phase us out altogether.” But the next words out of his mouth more than hinted at his salvation: “Reading scripts is obviously something a computer can do; convincing a client to invest more money requires some more skills. I’m already often more of a psychiatrist than a stockbroker.”
This approach involves finding a specialty within your profession that wouldn’t be economical to automate. In Boston, near the headquarters of Dunkin’ Donuts, a reporter recently peered into “the secret world of the Dunkin’ Donuts franchise kings.” One of them, Gary Joyal, makes a good living (if his Rolls-Royce is any indication) by connecting buyers and sellers of Dunkin’ Donuts franchises. As the Boston Globe put it, Joyal “uses his encyclopedic knowledge of franchisees—and often their family situations, income portfolios, and estate plans—to make himself an indispensable player for buyers and sellers alike.” So far he has helped to broker half a billion dollars’ worth of deals.
Another programmer went to great lengths to conceal the contours of his fully automated $50,000 per year job from his boss. Management could check in on his computer screen via the network, so he ran a loop of prerecorded video to hide the fact that he wasn’t actually working. In his advice-seeking post, Etherable wrote, “It doesn’t feel like I’m doing the right thing.”
RPA is often propped up as a mechanism to bolster return on investment or reduce costs. But Kris Fitzgerald, CTO of NTT Data Services, says more CIOs should use it to improve customer experience. For example, enterprises such as airlines employ thousands of customer service agents, yet customers are still waiting in the queue to have their call fielded. A chatbot, could help alleviate some of that wait. “You put that virtual agent in there and there is no downtime, no out sick and no bad attitude,” Fitzgerald says. “The client experience is the flag to hit.”
With tools like TestComplete, the evolution from manual to automated testing does not have to be difficult. By allowing you to see every action you make, either while generating test code or in administering tests, manual testers can see exactly where to make adjustments while they’re learning. After using automated testing tools and techniques, manual testing has proven to be an effective way of double-checking the software to make sure there is no stone left unturned. In that sense, manual and automated testing go hand-in-hand and, when used properly, can ensure that the final product is as good as it can be.

“It’s important to understand that are versions of each of the macronutrients that are healthier than others,” says Lauren Kelly, a registered dietitian in New York City. “It’s best to stick with the less processed foods, and instead choose whole, fresh food. The fewer ingredients, the better!” says Kelly. So for example, the following would be excellent choices for each of the macro categories, according to Hundt.
The nature of home automation devices can also be a problem for security, since patches to bugs found in the core operating system often do not reach users of older and lower-price devices.[33][34] One set of researchers say that the failure of vendors to support older devices with patches and updates leaves more than 87% of active devices vulnerable.[35][36]

The International Society of Automation (www.isa.org) is a nonprofit professional association that sets the standard for those who apply engineering and technology to improve the management, safety, and cybersecurity of modern automation and control systems used across industry and critical infrastructure. Founded in 1945, ISA develops widely used global standards; certifies industry professionals; provides education and training; publishes books and technical articles; hosts conferences and exhibits; and provides networking and career development programs for its 40,000 members and 400,000 customers around the world.


Experts say that BPM has five to six stages: planning and strategic alignment, process analysis, process design, process implementation, process monitoring, and process refinement, although the planning and strategic alignment stage is under debate. Regardless, all experts agree that the last step should include continuous improvement activities, making the overall process a cycle that never really ends.
States refer to the various conditions that can occur in a use or sequence scenario of the system. An example is an elevator, which uses logic based on the system state to perform certain actions in response to its state and operator input. For example, if the operator presses the floor n button, the system will respond depending on whether the elevator is stopped or moving, going up or down, or if the door is open or closed, and other conditions.[9]
TestLeft is a powerful yet lean functional testing tool for dev-testers working in Agile teams. It fully embeds into standard development IDEs enabling developers to easily and quickly create robust functional automated tests without leaving their favorite IDEs such as Visual Studio. It also works well with other tools in dev eco-systems such as source control or continuous integration systems. With TestLeft, developers can:
Allison is a freelance writer, fitness enthusiast, and long-time advocate of the ketogenic lifestyle. Once overweight, she contributes her success in losing over 75 lbs to both a low-carb, high-fat diet and moderate exercise. Residing in Tacoma, Washington, Allison enjoys getting out to explore the Pacific Northwest with her two children and taking in baseball games on lazy Sunday afternoons.
Forrester (one of the world’s most influential research and advisory firms) selected the top 11 tools that provide cross-browser testing, mobile testing, UI testing, and API testing capabilities. After evaluating these software testing tools based on vendor interviews, product evaluations, and customer interviews, they scored the tools on 33 criteria and ranked them against one another. Tools covered include IBM, Tricentis, Parasoft, HPE, SmartBear, TestPlant, Micro Focus, Microsoft, LogiGear, Original Software Conformiq. [Read this software testing tools list]

Angie Jones is a Consulting Automation Engineer who advises several Scrum teams on automation strategies and has developed automation frameworks for many software products. Angie speaks and teaches internationally at software conferences, serving as an Adjunct College Professor of Computer Programming, and also teaches tech workshops to young girls through TechGirlz and Black Girls Code. Find out more on LinkedIn and at angiejones.tech
As mentioned already, it will be my self and Mark making this happen. We have independently developed similar thinking with regard to automation, but more importantly, the same with testing. We’ve been working together for a number of years so this is a great progression for us. We both have strong reputations in this space and I believe our views are respected by the community.
As we can see, each of these automation tools has unique features to offer in addressing the growing challenges of software automation in the years ahead. Most provide capabilities for continuous testing and integration, test managementing, and reporting. They all support increasing automation needs for Web and Mobile testing. However, intelligent testing and smart analytics for adaptive and heterogeneous environments are still something to be desired for automation tools.

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Our in-memory computing solutions provide faster access to big data while our Business Process Management (BPM) and business process modeling solutions help create more efficient processes. Our master data management solutions ensure organizations can work with trusted shareable master data. And our complex event processing engine—the world’s fastest—provides streaming analytics for real-time big data and predictive analytics.

The automatic telephone switchboard was introduced in 1892 along with dial telephones.[35] By 1929, 31.9% of the Bell system was automatic. Automatic telephone switching originally used vacuum tube amplifiers and electro-mechanical switches, which consumed a large amount of electricity. Call volume eventually grew so fast that it was feared the telephone system would consume all electricity production, prompting Bell Labs to begin research on the transistor.[36]
Roberts notes, “Streamlining processes is my expertise, so I have a lot of experience here. Here's one high-level example: I worked on a technical risk management process that involved process streamlining and troubleshooting. Process upsets were two to three times more than plan. Staff satisfaction was poor. Annual business targets weren't met. After automating and streamlining that process, the process upsets were reduced to within 10 percent of plan. Staff satisfaction increased 20 percent. The business started meeting targets and saved over $3 million from efficiency gains. Talk about some serious results from automating!
But the smart home is evolving, and hubs are starting to feel a bit of a squeeze. Worthwhile standalone devices like the Amazon Echo can wrangle gadgets in a lot of the same ways as dedicated hubs -- and developers are falling over themselves to hop on board. Some have all but left the traditional hubs in the dust. Manufacturers have taken notice, and some have started working to integrate hub technology into existing devices with standalone appeal -- things like appliances, routers, and smart TVs. As a result, don't be surprised if the next generation of hubs are essentially invisible.

Take the test automation pyramid diagram and put it on your wall. It should serve as a reminder that the majority of automation tests should be at the unit test level, followed by those that can be executed at the API or service level. Finally, with strong test design, you can write a minimum set of automated UI tests to complete your automation test suite. Once you have this solid set of automation tests at your disposal, regression testing will be a breeze.
The promise of automation, touted by optimistic economists and sanguine futurists, has been that yielding work to machines would eliminate the drudgery of mindless, repetitive labor, freeing humans to fill our days with leisure, creative pursuits, or more dynamic work. In 1930, John Maynard Keynes famously speculated that “automatic machinery and the methods of mass production” would help deliver a 15-hour workweek—and even those hours would only be necessary to help men feel they had something to do.
Industrial automation incorporates programmable logic controllers in the manufacturing process. Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) use a processing system which allows for variation of controls of inputs and outputs using simple programming. PLCs make use of programmable memory, storing instructions and functions like logic, sequencing, timing, counting, etc. Using a logic based language, a PLC can receive a variety of inputs and return a variety of logical outputs, the input devices being sensors and output devices being motors, valves, etc. PLCs are similar to computers, however, while computers are optimized for calculations, PLCs are optimized for control task and use in industrial environments. They are built so that only basic logic-based programming knowledge is needed and to handle vibrations, high temperatures, humidity and noise. The greatest advantage PLCs offer is their flexibility. With the same basic controllers, a PLC can operate a range of different control systems. PLCs make it unnecessary to rewire a system to change the control system. This flexibility leads to a cost-effective system for complex and varied control systems.[88]
This helps to make output more predictable, reduce mistakes, and make your team happier (whoever used to have to trawl through the most spreadsheets will suddenly feel a lot better about their job!). Since a machine can run constantly without rest, you could have it process large sets of data on autopilot, 24/7. That’s something you’re not going to get out of even the most dedicated employee.
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