A global retailer was using its store closing reports to validate closing information for each of its registers across hundreds of stores. The store’s employees used a manual and sluggish process to pull up these reports. By automating the process the store freed up its employees to now focus on more customer-centric activities. The RPA robots now move the closing reports to one server, then read and consolidate the needed information for the store’s closing reports.
Two factors had a statistically significant relationship with satisfaction. The first was having good selection criteria and the second was the inclusion of key functions in the RPA project planning and execution.  Including representatives from information management, the target functions and especially HR (See Figure 3) is positively correlated with project satisfaction. According to Lyke-Ho-Gland, “HR is often included in organizations’ RPA steering committees, not only to allay fears and create buy-in but to create action plans and training for displaced FTEs. Ultimately this helps organizations use RPA as an opportunity to build capacity for sustainable growth rather than simply reducing costs.”

But if test automation is so limited, why do we do it in the first place? Because we have to, there is simply no other way. Because development adds up, testing doesn’t. Each iteration and release adds new features to the software (or so it should). And they need to be tested, manually. But new features also usually cause changes in the software that can break existing functionality. So existing functionality has to be tested, too. Ideally, you even want existing functionality to be tested continuously, so you recognise fast if changes break existing functionality and need some rework. But even if you only test before releases, in a team with a fixed number of developers and testers, over time, the testers are bound to fall behind. This is why at some point, testing has to be automated.
In software testing, test automation is the use of special software (separate from the software being tested) to control the execution of tests and the comparison of actual outcomes to predicted outcomes. Test automation can automate some repetitive but necessary tasks in a formalized testing process already in place, or add additional testing that would be difficult to perform manually.
The practice of performing robotic process automation results in the deployment of attended or unattended software agents to an organization's environment. These software agents, or robots, are deployed to perform pre-defined structured and repetitive sets of business tasks or processes. Artificial intelligence software robots are deployed to handle unstructured data sets and are deployed after performing and deploying robotic process automation. Robotic process automation is the leading gateway for the adoption of artificial intelligence in business environments.
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